Thursday, March 8, 2012

Brief History of Daylight Saving Time

Daylight Saving Time in the United States begins this weekend, early on Sunday morning, March 11, 2012, at 2:00 a.m. and ends Sunday, November 4, 2012, 2:00 a.m. 

The clock moves ahead (thus, losing one hour) when DST starts, in the spring in the northern hemisphere, and falls back one hour (thus, gaining one hour) when DST ends in the fall. To make it easier to remember which way the clock goes, keep in mind one of these sayings: “spring forward" or "spring ahead, fall behind." 

Benjamin Franklin first suggested Daylight Saving Time in 1784, but modern DST was not proposed until 1895 when an entomologist from New Zealand, George Vernon Hudson, presented a proposal for a two-hour daylight saving shift to the Wellington Philosophical Society.
The conception of DST was mainly credited to an English builder, William Willett in 1905, when he presented the idea to advance the clock during the summer months. His proposal was published two years later and introduced to the House of Commons in February 1908. The first Daylight Saving Bill was examined by a select committee but was never made into a law. It was not until World War I, in 1916, that DST was adopted and implemented by several countries in Europe who initially rejected the idea.

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Daylight Saving Time in the United States begins this weekend, early on Sunday morning, March 11, 2012, at 2:00 a.m. and ends Sunday, November 4, 2012, 2:00 a.m.

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